Microbiome digest, August 18, 2014

Mushroom microbiome, mice fed T7 phages, and uBiome got some money.

Plant microbiome

Comparative analysis of bacterial diversity and communities inhabiting the fairy ring of Tricholoma matsutake by barcoded pyrosequencing – M. Kim – Journal of Applied Microbiology

“The bacterial communities in soil samples collected from inside, beneath and outside the T. matsutake fairy ring were investigated using barcoded pyrosequencing. “

Rhizospheric fungal community structure of a Bt brinjal and a near isogenic variety – A.K. Singh – Journal of Applied Microbiology

“..this study concludes that genetic modification of brinjal crop has minor effect on the fungal community.”

Phages and viruses

Observation of inflammatory responses in mice orally fed with bacteriophage T7 – K. Park – Journal of Applied Microbiology

“A histopathological analysis of tissue samples from the stomach, small intestine and colon revealed no significant pathological change.”

Microbes in the news

GW High students to name bacterium – Maria Hernandez – Pacific Sunday News

“Students from George Washington High School got the opportunity to name a bacterium that was discovered during a historic underwater expedition to the Mariana Trench, which was led by filmmaker James Cameron in 2012.”

uBiome Raises $4.5M From Angel Investors, Andreessen Horowitz To Crowdsource Microbiome Research – Julian Chokkattu – Techcrunch

“uBiome also has the largest private dataset of human microbiome samples in the world, giving participants a quick way to compare what’s in their microbiome to a large group.”

Bik’s Picks

All Things Considered podcast (3 min): Often On The Move, Restless Elephants Are Tough To Count — And Keep Safe – Gregory Warner – NPR

The reason elephants are so hard to protect is the same that makes them so hard to count: They roam — exceptionally far.”

Mapping Cell Fate Conversion via CellNet, a Network Biology Tool – Kevin Mayer – GenEngNews

“The differentiation of engineered stem cells may be imagined as a subway journey, where the genetic equivalents of missing a transfer or getting off at the wrong stop can take your stem cells far off course.”

Camouflage sheet inspired by octopus – Jonathan Webb – BBC Science

“Based on the camouflage abilities of octopuses and cuttlefish, engineers in the US have built a flexible material that changes colour to match its surroundings.”

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