Human microbiome, June 17

Gut bacteria swapping DNA segments, what happens after a fecal transplant, intestinal archaea, and more.

Gut microbiome

Evidence of Extensive DNA Transfer between Bacteroidales Species within the Human Gut – Michael J. Coyne – mBio

“Using seven coresident Bacteroidales species from one individual and eight from another, we identified five large chromosomal regions, each present in a minimum of three of the coresident strains at near 100% DNA identity.”

Recovery of the Gut Microbiome following Fecal Microbiota Transplantation – Anna M. Seekatz – mBio

“Here we investigated changes in the fecal microbiota structure following FMT in patients with recurrent C. difficile infection, and imputed a hypothetical functional profile based on the 16S rRNA profile using a predictive metagenomic tool.”

The Intestinal Archaea Methanosphaera stadtmanae and Methanobrevibacter smithii Activate Human Dendritic Cells – Corinna Bang – PLOS ONE

“Taken together, our findings strongly argue that the archaeal gut inhabitants M. stadtmanae and M. smithii are specifically recognized by the human innate immune system. “

Microbiota and Metabolome Associated with Immunoglobulin A Nephropathy (IgAN) –
Maria De Angelis – PLOS ONE

“This study aimed at investigating the fecal microbiota, and the fecal and urinary metabolome of non progressor (NP) and progressor (P) patients with immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN). “

Respiratory microbiome

Impact of Experimental Human Pneumococcal Carriage on Nasopharyngeal Bacterial Densities in Healthy Adults – Joshua R. Shak – PLOS ONE

“These data on bacterial associations are the first to be reported surrounding experimental human pneumococcal colonization and show that co-colonizing effects are likely subtle rather than absolute.”

Vaginal microbiome

Diversity and stability of cultured vaginal lactobacilli in pregnant women from a multi-ethnic urban UK population – S.M. Husain – Journal of Applied Microbiology

“Self-collected vaginal swabs at 13 and 20 weeks gestation were obtained from women attending for routine antenatal care and cultured for lactobacilli.”

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