April 25, 2019

Good morning everyone! (and apologies for the delay, a technical issue regarding the system time difference between Israel and US Pacific time :)).

Due to yesterday extremely rich digest, today’s post will be short- but diverse! Spreading from gut microbiome in infants and beetles, to the effect of microbial communities on sweet wine quality. As a bonus for the upcoming weekend, at the end of the post you’ll find a link to an article listing 10 recommended biotech podcasts.

Happy holidays for all!

General Science and Microbiology

Failure to vaccinate and vaccine failure– Editorial- Nature Microbiology

The problem with unadjusted multiple and sequential statistical testing– Casper Albers- Nature Communications

Human microbiome

**Review – What did we learn from multiple omics studies in asthma?– Olga Ivanova- Allergy

Fecal microbiota transplant for Crohn disease: A study evaluating safety, efficacy, and microbiome profile– Liat Gutin- ueg

Specific class of intrapartum antibiotics relates to maturation of the infant gut microbiota: a prospective cohort study– Modupe O. Coker- BJOG

The Gut Microbiome on a Periodized Low-Protein Diet Is Associated With Improved Metabolic Health– Zhencheng Li- Frontiers in Microbiology

Plant microbiome

Characterization of Rhodopseudomonas palustris population dynamics on tobacco phyllosphere and induction of plant resistance to Tobacco mosaic virus infection– Pin Su- bioRxiv

The plant host induces antibiotic production to select the most beneficial colonizers– Ariel Ogran- AEM

Microbial network and soil properties are changed in bacterial wilt susceptible soil– Gaufo Qi- AEM

Water Microbiomes

Fates of antibiotic resistance genes in a distributed swine wastewater treatment plant– Qing-Bin Yuan- Water Environment Research

** Metabolic potential of uncultured bacteria and archaea associated with petroleum seepage in deep-sea sediments– Xiyang Dong- Nature Communications

Animal microbiome

Gut anatomical properties and microbial functional assembly promote lignocellulose deconstruction and colony subsistence of a wood-feeding beetle– Ceja Navarro- Nature Microbiology

Gut microbiome-derived phenyl sulfate contributes to albuminuria in diabetic kidney disease– Koichi kikuchi- Nature Communications

Honeybee-specific lactic acid bacterial supplements have no effect on American foulbrood infected honeybee colonies– Jorg G. Stephan- AEM

Food microbiome

Influence of microbial communities on the chemical and sensory features of Falanghina sweet passito wines– F De Fillips- Europe PMC

Microbiome in the News

The Asia Pacific human microbiome market is expected to reach US$ 207.81 Mn in 2025 -Cision

**UPDATED- Critical Reading required– Antibiotics: beneficial side effects are starting to come to light– Claire Bourke- The Conversation. I’m bringing about this post in order to encourage a discussion regarding the issues and claims that were written in this non-scientific article. You’re welcome to share your thoughts about it at the comments section below.

Podcasts

Top 10 Biotech Podcasts to Listen to this Spring– Clara Rodriguez Fernandez- Labiotech.eu

**Personal recommendation- This Week in Microbiolgy (TwiM)

One thought on “April 25, 2019

  1. When I read the recommended “Antibiotics: beneficial side effects are starting to come to light”, the title seemed misleading in multiple ways. Thus, I see it having two potential impacts:

    1. People will read the title only and come away with a very dangerous notion that antibiotics aren’t so bad.
    2. It will draw in people who don’t like the idea that antibiotics are/have been doing severe and permanent damage, and when those people read the article they will see that antibiotics do actually have those detrimental impacts. Though the article goes very light on those, and the “benefits” sections plus the title might outweigh the “detriments” section for people who have a personal bias.

    The opening statement in the article “The discovery of antibiotics in the 1920s has contributed to longer and healthier lives” is extremely suspicious, likely wrong, and provides no citation. “Longer” is likely (at least temporarily, till the detriments start to add up), “healthier” extremely unlikely (see Martin Blaser’s Missing Microbes).

    “they may explain why antibiotics continue to have health benefits despite antimicrobial resistance” – this is a completely nonsensical and non sequitur statement.

    Like

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