Non-human microbiome, June 24

Lots of marine microbiotas for you today, from corals, sponges, bivalves, to seawater and sediments.

Coral, sponges and other invertebrate microbiome

Coral transcriptome and bacterial community profiles reveal distinct Yellow Band Disease states in Orbicella faveolata – Collin J Closek – ISME Journal

“We profiled three conditions: (1) healthy-appearing colonies (HH), (2) healthy-appearing tissue on diseased colonies (HD), and (3) diseased lesion (DD). Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis revealed health state-specific diversity in Symbiodinium clade associations. “

Quantification of bacterial and archaeal symbionts in high and low microbial abundance sponges using real-time PCR – Kristina Bayer – FEMS Microbiology Ecology

“Here, we established qPCR assays for the specific quantification of four bacterial phyla of representative sponge symbionts as well as the kingdoms Eubacteria and Archaea. “

Comparative modifications in bacterial gill-endosymbiotic populations of the two bivalves Codakia orbiculata and Lucina pensylvanica during bacterial loss and reacquisition – Nathalie H. Elisabeth – FEMS Microbiology Ecology

“We used in situ hybridization, flow cytometry and X-ray fluorescence to characterize the symbiont population hosted in the gills of both species. I”

Plant microbiology

Links between plant and fungal communities across a deforestation chronosequence in the Amazon rainforest – Rebecca C Mueller – ISME Journal

“We combined high-throughput sequencing of fungal rDNA and molecular barcoding of plant roots to estimate fungal and plant community composition in soil sampled across a chronosequence of deforestation.”

Soil microbiology

High prevalence of biofilm synergy among bacterial soil isolates in cocultures indicates bacterial interspecific cooperation – Dawei Ren – ISME Journal

“Our results show a high prevalence of synergy in biofilm formation in multispecies consortia isolated from a natural bacterial habitat and suggest that interspecific cooperation occurs.”

High virus-to-cell ratios indicate ongoing production of viruses in deep subsurface sediments – Tim Engelhardt – ISME Journal

“Phages were detected by electron microscopy in deep (320 m below seafloor), ancient (~14 Ma old) and the most oligotrophic subsurface sediments of the world’s oceans (South Pacific Gyre (SPG)).”

Water and sediment microbiology

Contrasting spatiotemporal patterns and environmental drivers of diversity and community structure of ammonia oxidizers, denitrifiers, and anammox bacteria in sediments of estuarine tidal flats – Anjing Yang – Annals of Microbiology

“The alpha diversities (Shannon and Simpson indices) and community structure of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and archaea (AOA), denitrifier and anammox bacteria (AMB) were revealed using denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and clone library analysis of amoA, nosZ and 16S rRNA gene markers. “

Metagenomics reveals sediment microbial community response to Deepwater Horizon oil spill – Olivia U Mason – ISME Journal

“The 16S rRNA gene data indicated that the most heavily oil-impacted sediments were enriched in an uncultured Gammaproteobacterium and a Colwellia species, both of which were highly similar to sequences in the DWH deep-sea hydrocarbon plume. “

Microorganisms persist at record depths in the subseafloor of the Canterbury Basin – Maria-Cristina Ciobanu – ISME Journal

“Here we show that not only Bacteria and Archaea but also Eukarya occur at record depths in the subseafloor of the Canterbury Basin. Shifts in microbial community composition along a core of nearly 2 km reflect vertical taxa zonation influenced by sediment depth. “

The niche of an invasive marine microbe in a subtropical freshwater impoundment – K David Hambright – ISME Journal

“Using a long-term field study of the ‘invasive’ marine haptophyte Prymnesium parvum, we characterize the environmental niche of P. parvum in a subtropical impoundment in the southern United States.”

Unveiling microbial activities along the halocline of Thetis, a deep-sea hypersaline anoxic basin – Maria G Pachiadaki – ISME Journal

“This first metatranscriptome analysis of DHAB samples provides significant insights into shifts in metabolic activities of microorganisms as physicochemical conditions change from deep Mediterranean sea water to brine.”

Oxygen availability and distance to surface environments determine community composition and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing prokaroytes in two superimposed pristine limestone aquifers in the Hainich region, Germany
Sebastian Opitz – FEMS Microbiology Ecology

“We followed the abundance and compared the diversity of ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) in the groundwater of two superimposed pristine limestone aquifers located in the Hainich region (Thuringia, Germany) over 22 months”

Intertidal epilithic bacteria diversity changes along a naturally occurring carbon dioxide and pH gradient – Joe D Taylor – FEMS Microbiology Ecology

“Biofilms were sampled from three sites exposed to seawater with different pH/CO2 levels and diversity determined using high-throughput sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. “

Single-cell enabled comparative genomics of a deep ocean SAR11 bathytype
J Cameron Thrash – ISME Journal

“Here we examine the genomic basis for deep ocean distribution of one SAR11 bathytype (depth-specific ecotype), subclade Ic. Four single-cell Ic genomes, with estimated completeness of 55%–86%, were isolated from 770 m at station ALOHA and compared with eight SAR11 surface genomes and metagenomic datasets.”

A microarray for assessing transcription from pelagic marine microbial taxa
Irina N Shilova – ISME Journal

“Here we report on a collaborative effort to design MicroTOOLs (Microbiological Targets for Ocean Observing Laboratories), a high-density oligonucleotide microarray that targets functional genes of diverse taxa in pelagic and coastal marine microbial communities. “

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