Microbes and art: Future of Portugal, Fungi Mutarium, and Ahna Skop

The Future of Portugal as explained by Microorganisms –  Clara Rodríguez Fernández – Labiotech

Microbiology makes its mark at the first edition of the London Design Biennale taking place in Somerset House. Portugal’s exhibition by Marta de Menezes uses bacteria and viruses to create changing art that represents the future direction of the country. With the common topic “Design by Utopia“, 30 nations have interpreted utopic and dystopic futures using art to make us think about where we’re headed. Portuguese artist Marta de Menezes decided to use microbiology to represent the changing nature of her nation

Screen Shot 2016-10-02 at 5.55.12 PM.png

Decon by artist Marta de Menezes recreates Mondriaan paintings by colored media with bacteria.

 


Fungi Mutarium: Growing Food on Toxic Waste – Livin Studio

Livin Studio has, in collaboration with Utrecht University, developed a novel fungi food product grown on (plastic) waste, a prototype to grow it and culinary tools to eat it. (…)

Fungi Mutarium is a prototype that grows edible fungal biomass, mainly the mycelium, as a novel food product. Fungi is cultivated on specifically designed agar shapes that the designers called “FU”. Agar is a seaweed based gelatin substitute and acts, mixed with starch and sugar, as a nutrient base for the fungi. The “FUs” are filled with plastics. The fungi is then inserted, it digests the plastic and overgrows the whole substrate.

screen-shot-2016-10-02-at-6-01-00-pm

Decon by artist Marta de Menezes recreates Mondriaan paintings by colored media with bacteria.

 


Lecturer uses art to explain science – Derek Clayton – Iowa State Daily

More than 240 students and staff were greeted Monday by the sight of letter-shaped bacteria exploding out of petri dishes at Ahna Skop’s lecture titled “Too Creative for Science?” The petri dishes with bacteria letters were among the many pieces of art the associate professor of genetics at the University of Wisconsin-Madison used to wow the audience during her lecture. (…) Skop uses artwork to make it easier to understand complicated scientific concepts. From displaying bacterial worms to DNA helixes, she believes adding a visual aspect to science is absolutely vital in understanding it.

 

pecase2_h.jpg

Ahna Skop, credit: University of Wisconsin-Madison

 

Advertisements

One thought on “Microbes and art: Future of Portugal, Fungi Mutarium, and Ahna Skop

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s